Midnight’s Children by Salman Rushdie

Midnight’s Children is a 1981 novel by Salman Rushdie. It deals with India’s transition from British colonialism to independence and the partition of India. It is considered to be an example of postcolonial, postmodern, and magical realist literature.

You can read more about the book here:

Saleem Sinai is born at the stroke of midnight on August 15, 1947, the very moment of India’s independence. Greeted by fireworks displays, cheering crowds, and Prime Minister Nehru himself, Saleem grows up to learn the ominous consequences of this coincidence. His every act is mirrored and magnified in events that sway the course of national affairs; his health and well-being are inextricably bound to those of his nation; his life is inseparable, at times indistinguishable, from the history of his country. Perhaps most remarkable are the telepathic powers linking him with India’s 1,000 other “midnight’s children,” all born in that initial hour and endowed with magical gifts.

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Divided into three parts, the novel begins with the story of Siani’s family and the various events that lead to India’s independence and eventually to partition. Born precisely at the midnight, Saleem was born with telepathic powers and later discovers that all the kids born in India between 12 A.M. and 1 A.M. are impregnated with the special power.

Using his telepathic powers, he assembles a conference with all kids to reflect upon issues like culture, linguistic, religion, and political differences to shape the nation. Highlighting the relation between father and son and a nation yet in its nascent stage, it is an enchanting family adventure with lots of human drama and shocking summoning.

About the author:

Of Indian origin, Sir Ahmad Salman Rushdie born on 18 June 1947 is one of the best living writers in English. Combining historical fiction with magical realism, Rushdie has been courting controversy ever since Midnight’s Children was published in 1981. The novel went onto win the Booker Prize. The Satanic Verses, his fourth novel published in 1988, was banned in India and many Islamic countries. Facing death threats the author was granted protection in England. He moved to the USA in 2000, where he currently lives.

ALSO READ  Must-Read Salman Rushdie Books

If you want to know about must-read books by Salman Rushdie, click here.

For interesting facts about Salman Rushdie, click here.

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